Kenya is a country that beckons with iconic sights, tribal cultures and natural wonders – the snow-capped peak of mighty Mt Kenya, the Masai Mara's golden, grassy plains, the pink blush of Lake Nakuru and the annual migration of millions of wildebeest are but some of the delights waiting for you in Kenya.



KENYA TOP 10 TOUR DESTINATIONS

Cheetah Chase:

The cheetah, the Ferrari of the animal kingdom, is the fastest land animal on the planet. This slick predator can reach speeds of up to 120 km/hr and can accelerate to 103km/hr in just three seconds. Seeing a cheetah stealthily stalk, then pursue, a gazelle, springbok or an impala is a thrilling sight.

 

Lioness Kill:

See the circle of life play out in Masai Mara National Reserve. Lions might be the kings of the jungle, but in Kenya, it's the lionesses that do the hunting. Working in groups, these big cats track down prey such as wildebeest, impalas, zebras and buffalo. If you are lucky, you will see a kill - the lionesses hunting together, encircling a herd then targeting the closest animal. The attack is swift and powerful - an experience you will never forget!

 

Wildebeest Migration:

The annual migration of 1.5 million wildebeest across the grassy plains of Eastern Africa is an extraordinary spectacle of nature. The wildebeests risk drowning in rivers and attacks from big cats and crocodiles, to travel nearly 2,000 km in search of food and water. Around 200,000 zebra and 500,000 Thomson's gazelle also join this boisterous group each year, making it one of the greatest shows on earth.

 

Sea of Flamingos:

See Lake Nakuru turn a shimmering sea of pink as millions of flamingos flock to feed in the shallow waters. The sheer amount of these long-legged creatures - among 400 species of birds that inhabit the area - is an incredible sight.

 

Elephant Bath Time:

Elephants love water and, despite their size, they are excellent swimmers. To cool off from the scorching African sun, they splash about in lakes, paddle in rivers and give themselves a shower using their trunks. Witnessing these gentle giants having a bath is a truly memorable experience, but don't stand too close or you'll likely get very wet.

 

Rhino Love:

A baby rhino stays by its mother's side for up to five years after it is born and, during this time, mum is extremely protective of her calf. With an adult white rhino weighing up to 3,600 kg and reaching speeds of up to 50 km/h when charging, you don't want to get between a mother rhino and her baby. The best place for spotting the rare black rhino is Kenya's Aberdare National Park.

 

Giraffe Parade:

It's the classic African image – giraffes striding across the African savanna at sunset, nibbling on acacia trees and carving a graceful silhouette on the orange-tinged skyline. Kenya has the biggest giraffe population on the continent, so a dusk safari to see these unique creatures is a must.

 

Hippos Wallowing:

One of Africa's best locations for hippo spotting is Lake Naivasha. Here, you can see large pods of these mighty animals submerged in the water and wallowing in mud. More than just social interaction, the water helps them cool down and protects their skin from drying out. With the exception of feeding, hippos spend most of their lives in the water - from childbirth and reproduction, to fighting with other hippos - so it's very likely you'll see them playing in their aquatic playground.

 

Zebra Crossing:

For many, the highlight of the annual zebra migration is hundreds of thousands of these black-and-white-striped animals making the death-defying dash across the Mara River. Vulnerable to massive crocodiles lying in wait for a tasty meal, the zebras don't waste any time once they decide to take the plunge.

 

Monkey Business:

That chatter from treetops above is most likely from cheeky colobus monkeys. As these creatures spend nearly all of their lives in the forest canopy, your best chance of spotting them is as they dart through the trees, a flurry of black and white fur. Treating branches like trampolines, they leap high into the air, then drop downward, using the long hair on their shoulders like a parachute. Listen out for males, whose croaking roars can often be heard resonating throughout the forest.